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Production commercial editions for the Blind

Production commercial editions for the Blind

Our Mission Blind Spot creates unique opportunities for living artists to present significant new photographic work. We provide unmediated platforms where their vision can be expressed without compromise, free of commercial content or editorialization. We slow the pace of absorption and deepen the relationship between a work of art and its audience in order to counter the frenetic proliferation of disposable images that dominates our culture. In Blind Spot , images are given primacy and published collaboratively rather than curatorially, unaccompanied by introductory, biographical or explanatory text. Blind Spot bridges the gap between emerging and established artists, and creates a new context where each can benefit from the company of the other.

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Someone you know has a print disability; here’s how we’re helping

The use of 3-D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has moved well beyond prototyping, rapid tooling, trinkets, and toys. More companies will follow as the range of printable materials continues to expand.

Already available are basic plastics, photosensitive resins, ceramics, cement, glass, numerous metals, thermoplastic composites some infused with carbon nanotubes and fibers , and even stem cells.

In this article the author makes the case that additive manufacturing will gain ground quickly, given advantages such as greater flexibility, fewer assembly steps and other cost savings, and enhanced product-design possibilities. Industrial enterprises should revisit their operations to determine what network of supply chain assets and what mix of old and new processes will be optimal.

And leaders must consider the strategic implications as whole commercial ecosystems begin to form around the new realities of 3-D printing. Many of the biggest players already in the business of additive manufacturing are vying to develop the platforms on which other companies will build and connect. Platform owners will be powerful because production itself is likely to become commoditized over time. Those facilitating connections in the digital ecosystem will sit in the middle of a tremendous volume of industrial transactions, collecting and selling valuable information.

Additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, is poised to transform the industrial economy. Its extreme flexibility not only allows for easy customization of goods but also eliminates assembly and inventories and enables products to be redesigned for higher performance. Management teams should be reconsidering their strategies along three dimensions: 1 How might our offerings be enhanced, either by us or by competitors?

Inevitably, powerful platforms will arise to establish standards and facilitate exchanges among the designers, makers, and movers of 3-D-printed goods. The most successful of these will prosper mightily. Industrial 3-D printing is at a tipping point, about to go mainstream in a big way. The beginnings of the revolution show up in a PwC survey of more than manufacturing companies. Among the numerous companies using 3-D printing to ramp up production are GE jet engines, medical devices, and home appliance parts , Lockheed Martin and Boeing aerospace and defense , Aurora Flight Sciences unmanned aerial vehicles , Invisalign dental devices , Google consumer electronics , and the Dutch company LUXeXcel lenses for light-emitting diodes, or LEDs.

In addition to basic plastics and photosensitive resins, these already include ceramics, cement, glass, numerous metals and metal alloys, and new thermoplastic composites infused with carbon nanotubes and fibers.

Superior economics will eventually convince the laggards. Although the direct costs of producing goods with these new methods and materials are often higher, the greater flexibility afforded by additive manufacturing means that total costs can be substantially lower. With this revolutionary shift already under way, managers should now be engaging with strategic questions on three levels:.

First, sellers of tangible products should ask how their offerings could be improved, whether by themselves or by competitors. Second, industrial enterprises must revisit their operations.

As additive manufacturing creates myriad new options for how, when, and where products and parts are fabricated, what network of supply chain assets and what mix of old and new processes will be optimal? Third, leaders must consider the strategic implications as whole commercial ecosystems begin to form around the new realities of 3-D printing. At first these platforms will enable design-to-print activities and design sharing and fast downloading.

Soon they will orchestrate printer operations, quality control, real-time optimization of printer networks, and capacity exchanges, among other needed functions. The most successful platform providers will prosper mightily by establishing standards and providing the settings in which a complex ecosystem can coordinate responses to market demands. But every company will be affected by the rise of these platforms. There will be much jockeying among incumbents and upstarts to capture shares of the enormous value this new technology will create.

These questions add up to a substantial amount of strategic thinking, and still another remains: How fast will all this happen? Their answers will differ, but for all of them it seems safe to say that the time for strategic thinking is now. Traditional injection-molding presses, for example, can spit out thousands of widgets an hour.

By contrast, people who have watched 3-D printers in action in the hobbyist market often find the layer-by-layer accretion of objects comically slow. But recent advances in the technology are changing that dramatically in industrial settings. Some may forget why standard manufacturing occurs with such impressive speed. Those widgets pour out quickly because heavy investments have been made up front to establish the complex array of machine tools and equipment required to produce them.

The first unit is extremely expensive to make, but as identical units follow, their marginal cost plummets. However, it avoids the downside of standard manufacturing—a lack of flexibility. Because each unit is built independently, it can easily be modified to suit unique needs or, more broadly, to accommodate improvements or changing fashion. And setting up the production system in the first place is much simpler, because it involves far fewer stages.

But additive manufacturing increasingly makes sense even at higher scale. A big part of the additive advantage is that pieces that used to be molded separately and then assembled can now be produced as one piece in a single run. A simple example is sunglasses: The 3-D process allows the porosity and mixture of plastics to vary in different areas of the frame. The earpieces come out soft and flexible, while the rims holding the lenses are hard. No assembly required.

Printing parts and products also allows them to be designed with more-complex architectures, such as honeycombing within steel panels or geometries previously too fine to mill. Complex mechanical parts—an encased set of gears, for example—can be made without assembly. Additive methods can be used to combine parts and generate far more interior detailing. It expects to churn out more than 45, of the same design a year, so one might assume that conventional manufacturing methods would be more suitable.

But printing technology allows a nozzle that used to be assembled from 20 separately cast parts to be fabricated in one piece. Additive manufacturing can also use multiple printer jets to lay down different materials simultaneously.

Thus Optomec and other companies are developing conductive materials and methods of printing microbatteries and electronic circuits directly into or onto the surfaces of consumer electronic devices.

The enormous appeal of limiting assembly work is pushing additive manufacturing equipment to grow ever larger. At the current extreme, the U. Department of Defense, Lockheed Martin, Cincinnati Tool Steel, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are partnering to develop a capability for printing most of the endo- and exoskeletons of jet fighters, including the body, wings, internal structural panels, embedded wiring and antennas, and soon the central load-bearing structure.

So-called big area additive manufacturing makes such large-object fabrication possible by using a huge gantry with computerized controls to move the printers into position.

When this process has been certified for use, the only assembly required will be the installation of plug-and-play electronics modules for navigation, communications, weaponry, and electronic countermeasure systems in bays created during the printing process. In Iraq and Afghanistan the U. The clear implication is that managers in companies of all kinds should be working to anticipate how their businesses will adapt on the three strategic levels mentioned above.

Product strategy is the answer to that most basic question in business, What will we sell? Companies will need to imagine how their customers could be better served in an era of additive manufacturing. What designs and features will now be possible that were not before?

What aspects can be improved because restrictions or delivery delays have been eliminated? For example, in the aerospace and automotive industries, 3-D printing will most often be used in the pursuit of performance gains. Previously, the fuel efficiency of jet fighters and vehicles could be enhanced by reducing their weight, but this frequently made them less structurally sound.

The new technology allows manufacturers to hollow out a part to make it lighter and more fuel-efficient and incorporate internal structures that provide greater tensile strength, durability, and resistance to impact. And new materials that have greater heat and chemical resistance can be used in various spots in a product, as needed. Want to know how fast the 3-D future is coming? Look at the innovation rates of inventors.

In only 80 patents relating to additive manufacturing materials, software, and equipment were granted worldwide, not counting duplicates filed in multiple countries. By that number had gone into orbit, with approximately new nonduplicative patents issued around the globe.

What are some of the companies behind these patents? Not surprisingly, the two leaders are Stratasys and 3D Systems, rivals that have staked out positions in additive manufacturing. They hold 57 and 49 nonduplicative patents respectively. As befits its printing heritage, Xerox, too, has invested heavily in additive technologies for making electronics and has developed a strong alliance with 3D Systems.

Panasonic, Hewlett-Packard, 3M, and Siemens likewise hold numerous patents. But surprisingly, the largest users of 3-D printing have also been active innovators. Fourth on the list, with 35 patents, is Therics, a manufacturer of medical devices. Also noteworthy among patent holders are companies that straddle both worlds. GE and IBM are important manufacturers but are increasingly invested in platforms that optimize value chains run by other companies. Both are well positioned to take on similar roles with regard to additive manufacturing—and both bear watching as models for how incumbents can capture disproportionate value from a highly disruptive technology.

In other industries, the use of additive manufacturing for more-tailored and fast-evolving products will have ramifications for how offerings are marketed. What happens to the concept of product generations—let alone the hoopla around a launch—when things can be upgraded continually during successive printings rather than in the quantum leaps required by the higher tooling costs and setup times of conventional manufacturing?

Real-time changes in product strategy, such as product mix and design decisions, would become possible. With such rapid adaptation, what new advantages should be core to brand promises? And how could marketing departments prevent brand drift without losing sales? Operations strategy encompasses all the questions of how a company will buy, make, move, and sell goods. The answers will be very different with additive manufacturing.

Greater operational efficiency is always a goal, but it can be achieved in many ways. Today most companies contemplating the use of the technology do piecemeal financial analysis of targeted opportunities to swap in 3-D equipment and designs where those can reduce direct costs.

Much bigger gains will come when they broaden their analyses to consider the total cost of manufacturing and overhead. How much could be saved by cutting out assembly steps? Or by slashing inventories through production only in response to actual demand?

Or by selling in different ways—for example, direct to consumers via interfaces that allow them to specify any configuration? In a hybrid world of old and new manufacturing methods, producers will have many more options; they will have to decide which components or products to transition over to additive manufacturing, and in what order. Additional questions will arise around facilities locations.

How proximate should they be to which customers? How can highly customized orders be delivered as efficiently as they are produced?

Collecting Guide: 11 key things to know about Prints & Multiples

The use of 3-D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has moved well beyond prototyping, rapid tooling, trinkets, and toys. More companies will follow as the range of printable materials continues to expand. Already available are basic plastics, photosensitive resins, ceramics, cement, glass, numerous metals, thermoplastic composites some infused with carbon nanotubes and fibers , and even stem cells. In this article the author makes the case that additive manufacturing will gain ground quickly, given advantages such as greater flexibility, fewer assembly steps and other cost savings, and enhanced product-design possibilities.

This site uses cookies. By using this site you are agreeing to our privacy and cookie policy. With its cast of characters making their hesitant way through the Nanjing rain, it calls to mind the downpours of Mystery , which seems like an obvious commercial parallel.

At Open Book Publishers we believe that the dissemination of research should be led by academic institutions and research centers, rather than by commercial publishers. We collaborate with these groups to create one-off publications or to develop whole series. We also collaborate with like-minded organisations to develop open infrastructure for the publication of open access works, to disseminate our books via open platforms and services, and to promote our vision and values across the world. Our model offers societies and research institutions a flexible and affordable way of publishing, with the opportunity to include online multi-media content.

Someone you know has a print disability; here’s how we’re helping

Open Science. Research Intelligence. Research Community. Your Career. The awards were announced at the London Book Fair. Here's a short interview with Dr. My little brother is one of my top heroes. Growing up, he struggled and struggled in school despite being creative and intelligent.

Robert Finley, Blind Vietnam War Vet, Wows ‘America’s Got Talent’ Judges (Watch)

There has long been a rumor that a Costco vodka imported from France is produced by the high-end brand Grey Goose. Vodka enthusiasts say this is why Costco's Kirkland bottle tastes so good. It has frequently defeated Grey Goose in blind tastings despite being a third of the price: Costco's 1. Read more: 22 secrets to save time and money shopping at Costco. Grey Goose's website poetically describes the process of making the spirit: "Single-origin soft wheat" is picked in the Picardy region of northern France, or "the bread-basket of France," distilled once, then sent to Cognac to be blended with spring water from the brand's own well.

Selling Rights has firmly established itself as the leading guide to all aspects of rights sales and co-publications throughout the world. The eighth edition is substantially updated to illustrate the changes in rights in relation to new technologies and legal developments in the UK and the rest of the world.

CAA uses cookies on its website to improve user experience. By visiting this site you consent to our Privacy Policy. Published in CAA Newsletter 3, no.

Braille e-book

From woodcuts to lithographs, originals vs editions, the importance of different types of paper, and much more besides. A print is any work of art made in multiple iterations, created through a transfer process. There are many different types of prints, and the process is constantly evolving, but the four best-known techniques are etching, lithography, screenprint and woodcut. Etching: Using an etching needle, an artist scratches an image onto a metal plate covered with wax.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: First Visually Impaired Music Production & Audio Engineering Student

JAWS " Job Access With Speech " is a computer screen reader program for Microsoft Windows that allows blind and visually impaired users to read the screen either with a text-to-speech output or by a refreshable Braille display. There are two versions of the program: the Home edition for non-commercial use and the Professional edition for commercial environments. The JAWS Scripting Language allows the user to use programs without standard Windows controls, and programs that were not designed for accessibility. JAWS was originally released in by Ted Henter , a former motorcycle racer who lost his sight in a automobile accident. Petersburg, Florida. Joyce sold his interest in the company back to Henter in

The 3-D Printing Revolution

A braille e-book is a refreshable braille display using electroactive polymers or heated wax rather than mechanical pins to raise braille dots on a display. Though not inherently expensive, due to the small scale of production they have not been shown to be economical. Some e-books are produced simultaneously with the production of a printed format, as described in electronic publishing. Braille books were initially written in paper, with Perkins Brailler typewriter, a machine invented in , and improved in , another way of produce braille books was with Braille printers or embossers. In David S. Morgan produced the first SMART Brailler machine, with added text to speech function and allowed digital capture of data entered. A Korean concept design published in by Yanko Design attracted attention.

JAWS ("Job Access With Speech") is a computer screen reader program for Microsoft Windows that allows blind and visually impaired users to read the screen either with a text-to-speech output or by a refreshable Braille display. JAWS is produced by the Blind and Low Vision Group of Freedom Scientific. There are two versions of the program: the Home edition for non-commercial.

The author of these guidelines, Sarah Hilderley, is grateful to the many people who contributed time and expertise to their preparation and development; and by name would like to acknowledge the extensive input and advice given by the following people in ensuring that this publication provides the most practical and usable advice for publishers. It is updated regularly and if you have any comments, suggestions or information that should be included please contact Sarah Hilderley at sarah editeur. Guidelines for Internal Accessibility Lead. These are people with visual impairments, with dyslexia, or with motor disabilities which can seriously affect their ability to read.

How to Identify First Editions

As we've mentioned elsewhere, first edition means the first printing of a book. Edition and printing can be used fairly interchangeably in talking about collectible books, especially in regard to modern fiction. For the most part, the first edition of a book is more meaningful to the world of book collectors than it was to the publisher who printed it. That's because the first printing only represents a portion of the total number of copies of a book that the publisher hopes to sell.

Accessible Publishing Best Practice Guidelines for Publishers

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Я видел схему.

Росио - одно из самых популярных женских имен в Испании. В нем заключено все, что ассоциируется с представлением о молодой католичке: чистота, невинность, природная красота. Чистота заключена в буквальном значении имени - Капля Росы.

В ушах зазвучал голос старого канадца. Капля Росы.

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В ужасе от того, что ее ожидало, она направилась к кабинету шефа. Когда Сьюзан уже сделала несколько шагов, что-то вдруг показалось ей странным. Она остановилась и снова начала вглядываться в глубь помещения Третьего узла.

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  1. Voodoole

    Very good idea