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Product products from porcelain, faience, semi-porcelain and majolica

Product products from porcelain, faience, semi-porcelain and majolica

As peculiar as some of the pieces themselves, the language of ceramics is vast and draws from a global dictionary. Peruse our A-Z to find out about some of the terms you might discover in our incredible galleries. Ceramic objects are often identified by their marks. Marks like the Chelsea anchor or the crossed-swords of Meissen are well known and were often pirated , while the significance of others is uncertain. One such mysterious mark is the capital A found on a rare group of 18th-century British porcelains.

VIDEO ON THE TOPIC: How Are Ceramic Mugs Mass Produced?

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Types of ceramic dishes

Majolica, faience, and delftware are terms that describe glazed earthenware objects. Yet there are distinguishing factors among these products that are often misunderstood; this article provides a brief historical overview in an attempt to create some order out of the confusion.

By the first half of the fifteenth century the cities of Brugge and Antwerp in the Southern Netherlands, now Belgium, were importing Italian earthenware through their trade connections with Italy, Spain, and Portugal. Majolica, as the pottery came to be known, is an earthenware product coated with a highly translucent lead glaze on the back, which is rendered an opaque white on the front by the addition of tin oxide. The Italian city of Faenza was a recognized center for earthenware production.

By the mid-fifteenth century the earthenware industry was well established in Antwerp, as reflected in the founding of the Guild of Saint Luke St. Lucas Gilde ; this guild existed for many centuries and stretched throughout the Netherlands. The books of the guild report that at the end of the fifteenth century several Italian majolica and faience makers had moved to Antwerp. Under religious pressure, many of the reformists left Antwerp in the second half of the sixteenth century, and moved to various destinations including London, England, Hamburg, Germany, and the Northern Netherlands, specifically to the city of Haarlem.

In the beginning of the seventeenth century, many earthenware makers left Haarlem for the city of Delft. When export from the Far East ceased in the last quarter of the seventeenth century, due to a war in China, the Dutch Delft faience producers tried to fill the niche in the market mainly by producing items with the opaque white tin glaze decorated with typical Chinese scenes Fig.

Looking back at the names of Delft factories, we find hints to their history. The Porcelain Axe and Porcelain Bottle factories, for example, likely selected their names to compete with the true porcelain market; the latter factory now produces true porcelain. The Three Barrels factory probably used the same name as the beer brewers who had occupied the building prior to the faience producers.

Within the next century-and-a-half the Delft producers became so successful that their products were imitated by many European and Far East factories and cities. At the height of production in the eighteenth century, the Guild of Saint Luke counted almost forty factories in the small city of Delft.

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Majolica, Faience, and Delftware Boards. Robert Aronson is a director of Aronson Antiquairs of Amsterdam. Founded in , they are the leading European dealer in Dutch Delftware.

For more information on the subject, visit www. All images courtesy of Aronson Antiquairs of Amsterdam. This article is written from a Dutch perspective.

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Gzhel Porcelain

Essentially, there are all different kinds of ceramics, which you will see if you read the definitions below; I cannot claim to have necessarily written them — these are all based on readings I have done myself. The different types tend to relate to 1 the kind of clay used; 2 the firing temperature porcelain is fired at a much higher temperature than earthenware ; 3 the length of firing; 4 whether the finished product is glazed or not; 5 whether the finished is porous or not; 6 how sturdy it is. Faience, Majolica, or Delft: High-fired, tin-glazed earthenware, usually decorated with a Faience, Majolica, or Delft: High-fired, tin-glazed earthenware, usually decorated with a lot of color and in traditional designs. Terra Cotta: An unglazed, lightly fired reddish earthenware.

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Dishes are one of the things we use most in our everyday life, but dishes can be used not only in the kitchen. Of course, most often different plates, cups, pots, kettles, bowls and so on we use for cooking or serving food. But besides this, in our homes there are vases, pots for plants, in the bathroom there are soap dishes and glasses for toothbrushes and much more. All of them can be made of different materials, including of ceramics.

A-Z of Ceramics

Represent Royal Tichelaar Makkum describes the last 15 years of the long history of this Frisian earthenware factory and the Netherlands' oldest company. Under the impassioned leadership of director Jan Tichelaar, Royal Tichelaar Makkum is undergoing a number of decisive changes. By combining century-old craftsmanship with innovative projects by designers and architects, he has succeeded in broadening the company's activities to include contemporary products in the fields of architecture and design. The production of traditional earthenware, one of Holland's most famous national products, will continue alongside these new advancements. In this way, new products within both disciplines are being developed while traditional craftsmanship undergoes unique innovations. Represent Royal Tichelaar Makkum outlines the context which gave rise to these developments and gives a picture of the many inspiring products it has generated. A sudden start Lidewij Edelkoort. It should make a difference Dingeman Kuilman. A fruitful marriage Louise Schouwenberg.

Majolica, Faience, and Delftware

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more Got it! The porcelain clock on the wall proclaimed the time as ten minutes until twelve, but it didn't seem that late. This is undoubtedly the finest jewelled porcelain in Japan; the best examples leave nothing to be desired The factorys period of excellence began about the year I , ant culminated at the close of the 18th century. The existence of porcelain clay in Hizen was not discovered for many years, and Shonzuis pieces being made entirely with kaolin imported from China, their manufacture ceased after his death, though knowledge of the processes learned by him survived and was used in the production of greatly inferior wares.

Ceramics from the Greek word "keramos", which means clay are products that are produced by sintering clays and mixtures of clays with mineral additives. As a result of heat treatment, ceramics acquires properties that determine its widespread use in various sectors of the national economy.

While our folk art and handicraft are gorgeous, the pottery is simply brilliant. Gzhel — Nowadays, the name Gzhel is used to describe artisan porcelain and pottery production and painting. Since ancient times the village of Gzhel and the entire Gzhel Oblast have been famous for their clay deposits; which have been actively mined since the 17th century. The extracted clay originally was used to manufacture pots for pharmaceutical products.

Tin-glazed pottery

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Pottery Greek - pottery, from the word keramos - clay - are products that are manufactured by sintering a mixture of clay and clay with mineral additives. Pottery common in everyday life dishes, ceramic figurines, vases, pictures , it is used in construction, in the arts. There are basic types of ceramics: terracotta, majolica, faience, porcelain. The history of ceramics varied and very interesting. When a man has learned to handle the clay, he began to make the dishes.

General information about ceramics. Ceramic Products

Gzhel Porcelain. After the revolution of , the private workshops and factories were appropriated by the Soviet state and united as a ceramics guild in Turygino Village , about 60 kilometers from Moscow. No membership needed. These villages have long been engaged in the manufacture of china, faience, semi-faience and majolica. Gzhel is also the word for traditional Russian blue and white porcelain produced there since the 19 th century - the region is famous for it. The workshops eventually became a factory with pieces being formed in moulds and potters being responsible for separate pieces, a specific style, or decoration.

There are manufactures of paper, hats, leather, ropes, porcelain, majolica, Cigars, woollen goods, gloves, hats and porcelain are among the chief manufactures. 6 . Eisen was the first to manufacture porcelain (as distinguished from faience) belleek china, semi-porcelain, white granite and c. c. ware, vitrified porcelain.

Majolica, faience, and delftware are terms that describe glazed earthenware objects. Yet there are distinguishing factors among these products that are often misunderstood; this article provides a brief historical overview in an attempt to create some order out of the confusion. By the first half of the fifteenth century the cities of Brugge and Antwerp in the Southern Netherlands, now Belgium, were importing Italian earthenware through their trade connections with Italy, Spain, and Portugal. Majolica, as the pottery came to be known, is an earthenware product coated with a highly translucent lead glaze on the back, which is rendered an opaque white on the front by the addition of tin oxide.

Burnt clay pottery. What is ceramics?

Ceramics has been known since ancient times and is probably the first man-made artificial material. Take a walk in the excavations of any ancient site of ancient settlement. What do you see in abundance under your feet?

The history of the iconic Dutch faience produced mainly in the western Dutch city of Delft is drawn up in many publications. Museums and studenst in the Netherlands and around the world are continuously researching certain aspects of a product the played such a pivoting role in the history of arts, of the first encounters between Europe and the Far East and of the comencement of the production of faience and porcelain in other European cities. Both Meissen and Sevres drew on the knowledge built over centuries in Delft. In the first half of the 15th century, mercantile cities such as Brugge Bruges and Antwerp in the southern Netherlands now Belgium became familiar with earthenware from southern Europe through both trade and political contacts with Italy, Spain and Portugal.

Tin-glazed pottery is earthenware covered in lead glaze with added tin oxide [1] which is white, shiny and opaque see tin-glazing for the chemistry ; usually this provides a background for brightly painted decoration. It has been important in Islamic and European pottery , but very little used in East Asia.

The invention of a white pottery glaze suitable for painted decoration, by the addition of an oxide of tin to the slip of a lead glaze, was a major advance in the history of pottery. The invention seems to have been made in Iran or the Middle East before the ninth century. The term is now used for a wide variety of pottery from several parts of the world, including many types of European painted wares, often produced as cheaper versions of porcelain styles. English generally uses various other terms for well-known sub-types of faience.

The word "ceramics" comes from the Greek word "ceramics" - pottery, derived from "ceramos" - clay. Clay as a material for the manufacture of household utensils was known to mankind in ancient times. The history of ceramic production using firing begins several millennia ago. Initially, the main type of ceramic products was utensils. The proliferation of ceramics has played a huge role in the history of mankind.

Tin-glazed Majolica plate from Faenza , Italy. Tin-glazed pottery is pottery covered in glaze containing tin oxide which is white, shiny and opaque. See tin-glazing. The pottery body is usually made of red or buff colored earthenware and the white glaze was often used to imitate Chinese porcelain.

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  1. Kazranris

    What phrase... super, magnificent idea